Anatomy And Physiology Of Blood Flow Through The Heart Interdependence – How the Systems of the Human Body Perfectly Exemplify It

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Interdependence – How the Systems of the Human Body Perfectly Exemplify It

Interdependence means relying on each other. In reality, the human body consists of many interacting ‘systems’ including skeletal and muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Organs that work in unison are also found in these systems.

the skeleton

The body relies on the rigid framework of the skeleton for support and the internal organs rely on it for protection while the muscles use the skeleton for anchorage.

muscles

There are three types of muscle movement: skeletal, smooth, and cardiac.

Skeletal movements, initiated by the nervous system, are determined by muscles attached to the skeleton. The digestive system, bladder, and blood vessels depend on smooth muscle, and along with the cardiac muscle, the heart functions.

nervous system

The brain and spinal cord that contain the central nervous system (CNS) bank on the senses (eyes, nose, and ears) and send them signals that they integrate.

Endocrine and circulatory systems

Glands (hypothalamus, pituitary, and thyroid), pancreas, kidneys, ovaries (females only), testes (males only), adrenals, parathyroid, pineal body, and brain secrete hormones directly into the circulatory system. Blood flow to appropriate tissues.

Cardiovascular system

The heart measures the arteries through which it pumps blood out of the blood vessels. The lungs supply oxygen to the blood and the intestines supply nutrients that the blood carries to all cells in the body.

The cardiovascular system also relies on blood to remove waste products from cells; The tissues and kidneys then excrete them as urine and the lungs as carbon dioxide. The heart beats the veins to pump oxygenated blood. (It is interesting to note that the entire circuit lasts only one minute.)

respiratory system

Human respiration turns to muscle reflexes that cause the diaphragm and internal intercostal muscles to contract. As the volume in the chest cavity increases, the air pressure in it decreases. The air then passes through the nose, down the trachea and into the lungs, exchanging oxygen and carbon dioxide.

Lymphatic and circulatory system

Lymph vessels, lymph nodes and its lymphoid organs (spleen and tonsils) remove excess fluid from body tissues and return it to the circulatory system. (Note that this helps fight infection.)

Digestive and urinary system

The mouth is the beginning of the digestive system. As it descends, the salivary glands, epiglottis, esophagus, liver, stomach, gall-bladder, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, appendix, rectum, and anus are found.

The mouth contains teeth that take care of biting and chewing, and the tongue shapes food into an easily swallowed bolus.

A flap of cartilage at the root of the tongue rests on the epiglottis, is depressed during swallowing, and covers it.

In addition to the mouth, the digestive system includes the esophagus (which connects the throat to the stomach), the stomach, the small and large intestines (the lower part of the esophagus from the end of the stomach to the anus), the rectum (the last part). excretory opening at end of alimentary canal).

Through a system of ducts, the digestive system is connected to the salivary glands (which secrete fluids into the mouth to ensure lubrication, aid in chewing and swallowing, and facilitate digestion), the gall bladder (which stores bile after it is secreted by the liver). and before it is released into the intestine) and the pancreas (which provides bile and enzymes to aid digestion), and the liver, which helps metabolize food products into forms that can be stored, for example, fats and proteins. In the large intestine, undigested food solidifies into feces that are passed out through the anus.

urinary system

Kidneys filter blood to produce urine through which waste products are excreted. The ureters lead to the bladder which stores urine. For this to happen, the bladder contracts, the bladder and urethral outlets (sphincters) relax, and urine is expelled. (Note that a woman’s bladder is smaller and lower in a man’s abdomen, and her urethra is about one-fifth the length of a man’s.

reproductive system

Reproductive organs produce sex cells (ova in female ovaries, sperm in male testes), which ensure fertilization of the ovum through sexual intercourse. Then the uterus (womb) receives the egg. (This provides a safe environment for the developing fetus during the 9-month gestation period.)

A lesson in humanity

We have discovered that each body system and various organs have specific roles to play in the body, but they do not work in isolation. When a system or organ completes its function, it depends on others to pick up where it left off. It also depends on others to carry the work forward. This interdependence helps the body to function in perfect harmony and ensure its survival.

Is there a lesson here for families, peoples, communities, nations and continents to learn to cooperate with each other for the good of the world? Your answer is as good as mine.

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