Air Flow Through Duct With Electric Heater Temp Change Ceiling Insulation – Aerolite and Isotherm

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Ceiling Insulation – Aerolite and Isotherm

Ceiling insulation like Aerolite and Isotherm act as a heat flow barrier between your roof tiles and roof and prevent heat from escaping, keeping it cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Well-designed and insulated homes with insulation that meets the needs will keep you comfortable year-round and cut your home heating and cooling costs by nearly half, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Weather conditions will also affect the correct level and thickness required for installation. Whether you’re trying to keep the heat in, out, or both, it’s a must-install. Ceiling insulation is effective against daily temperature changes as well as seasonal ones.

Another important factor is the design technique. If the roof insulation is installed in an area where the shade or curtains are not thick enough to block the morning and afternoon sun, you can have the opposite effect, trapping heat from windows or doors and creating an oven. result

Moisture problems such as condensation can be eliminated by installing reflective ceiling insulation and can help weather proof your home or office. Aerolite and Isotherm ceiling insulation also have excellent sound absorption properties and are good for soundproofing a room or office. While it is best to install ceiling insulation during construction, new building regulations require all new homes to be insulated and achieve a membrane R-value to comply.

Ceilings, floors, and ceilings themselves have some thermal resistance but not enough to comply with the 10400-xa Building Code.

Different climate zones require different R-values ​​to comply with 10400-xa building codes

When choosing the right ceiling insulation, there are two main categories to choose from – reflective or bulk insulation. To achieve an even greater insulating effect, reflectors and bulk insulation are combined. Examples of combined insulation can be Factorylite which is Airolite combined with reflective insulation or Isofoil which is Isotherm combined with reflective insulation. A product’s R-value determines the product’s ability to resist heat flow. The higher the R-value, the better insulating effect you will get out of the product.

A lot of insulation

Bulk insulation is excellent at resisting convective and conducted heat. Heat is trapped in pockets within the insulation structure. Thermal resistance works the same way and it doesn’t matter which way the heat flows through it. The two types of insulation currently on the market are bulk insulation and reflective insulation. The leading bulk insulations are Think Pink Aerolite which is a glass wool product and Isotherm ceiling insulation which is a polyester material. Bulk insulation comes with an R-value that varies depending on the thickness of the insulation you have.

45% savings on cooling and heating energy can be achieved with roof and ceiling insulation

20% additional cooling and heating energy with wall bulk insulation

5% on winter costs with proper floor insulation on your home

Radiant heat flow is resisted by insulation with reflective properties, this is achieved because insulation is highly reflective and has the ability to re-radiate heat. Reflective insulation is a 25 mm layer of air next to the glazed surface. Heat flows through reflective insulation differently depending on which direction the heat source is coming from.

Reflective aluminum foil that is laminated to paper or plastic is how reflective foil insulation is made. The performance of reflective insulation can be reduced by dust that settles on it over time. Dust reduces reflectivity. The shiny foil surface should always face downwards. The anti-glare surface of single-sided foil should always face upwards or outwards.

Up and down R-values ​​are supplied with reflective insulation. The R-value of products will vary depending on how and where the insulation is installed. Always make sure that the values ​​given by the manufacturer correspond to what you are looking for.

When installing any type of roof insulation, you must avoid leaving any gaps. Even the smallest gaps in roof insulation can reduce the insulating value. The roof insulation must fit snugly into the beams and leave no gaps around ducts and pipes. Add in reflective insulation and holes must be properly sealed and taped if necessary. Ceilings, floors and walls can cause a lot of heat loss, so make sure these areas are properly insulated. When installing roof insulation, it is important to leave minimum clearance around items such as transformers and down lights as overheating can cause problems in your roof.

Wall insulation must fit snugly around door and window frames, and there must be thermal breaks around metal frames to allow heat loss in really cold areas. Internal walls at home or more often used in offices need to be properly insulated, this will also soundproof the room and give less echo.

Never shrink bulk roof insulation! This reduces the ability of the roof insulation to insulate properly. Small air spaces in roof insulation trap hot air. Adequate space is required to maintain the thickness of the roof insulation. Vapor barriers such as sisalization or spunsulation must be used to keep moisture away from bulk roof insulation, or you may experience a reduction in the insulating performance of the products. Use reflective roof insulation vapor barriers where condensation can occur.

Loose fill roof insulation should not be used in roofs with a slope of 25 degrees or more. Because it’s loose and not in a roll like Aerolite or Isotherm, you can’t keep it thick at angles. Roll form roof insulation is the best way to insulate your home or office, as the installed material can maintain its thickness and not reduce the R-value in the membrane area, allowing loose insulation to flow around your roof regardless of slope and high winds. . Remember that loose fill roof insulation will settle down to 25 percent of its original thickness over time.

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