According To Csikszentmihalyi The Flow Experience Is Optimal When Waking the Tiger, Healing Trauma, by Peter A, Levine

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Waking the Tiger, Healing Trauma, by Peter A, Levine

Many people who have suffered severe emotional trauma (for example, people from recently bereaved, war-torn countries, who have been tortured or sexually assaulted) or physical injury (eg, severe neglect, debilitating injuries) recover completely or almost completely. Tragedy. However, others don’t get it right and continue to relive the same horrible experiences of long-term morbid fear, pain and anxiety. These latter groups of people are traumatized by their bad experiences.

In their book “Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma,” Levine and Frederick (1997) state that this is the result of bottled up somatosensory symptoms that occur after trauma. Levine and Frederick (1997) stated that there are three main ways people respond when faced with a traumatic experience. They can fight (deal with the situation), flee (walk away from the situation) or freeze (be completely overwhelmed by the situation to the point of immobility). Victims who fight or run away from a traumatic experience are better at handling the trauma than those who freeze in response to the shock (Levine & Frederick, 1997). This state of suspended animation and paralysis occurs unconsciously and involuntarily. In this state of freezing, the victim has no way of going through all the specific reactions associated with the traumatic event (Levine & Frederick, 1997). Because they are not adequately released by the victim, trapped emotions continue to haunt the traumatized person.

Therefore, the solution to trauma is to guide the victim along a path (Experiential Sensation-Felt Sense) that allows them to understand and release those trapped emotions (Levine & Frederick, 1997). This approach to trauma healing was derived from learning how animals recover from traumatic experiences (Levine and Frederick 1997). Levine and Frederick (1997) stated that coping with trauma must be primarily at the level of the emotional, limbic brain and not just at the level of the rational, executive brain.

Lewin and Friedrich’s theory of trauma is also supported in some ways by polyvagal theory, which suggests that trauma has a somatic experiential component. If, as indicated by polyvagal theory and Levine and Frederick’s (1997) theory, the trauma has strong emotional roots, then one can apply elements of a relationship model such as the DIR model to handle the trauma. After determining the victim’s level of functional emotional development capacity, a DIR practitioner can begin to appeal to, build on, and strengthen the identified areas of weakness, thus allowing the victim to recover from past traumatic events. Calming the traumatized person is one tool in the DIR toolbox for regulating traumatized individuals. A calm mind creates the opportunity for further regulation of emotions and understanding of deep-rooted emotions, all of which are necessary for trauma victims to break free from the bonds of the past and reach new heights of performance.

Other applicable trauma theories include the NARM model, which focuses on the mind and suggests that trauma is associated with maladaptive adaptations in the victim’s attachment history. The PTSD model suggests that trauma victims are applying solutions to their current problems that worked and were appropriate in the past.

In my opinion, attachment and trauma appear as opposite ends of the same emotional spectrum, it is obvious that attachment is mostly positive, for example, in the case of extreme attachments/dependencies, trauma is almost always negative, at least until it resolves. Trauma treatment requires a dedicated practitioner, who is willing to learn from their victims and understand their challenges to develop appropriate management strategies.

Recognition of signs and symptoms of concussion, timely referral to a trauma specialist, and combining the many methods mentioned may lead to the best results in the management of traumatized children and adults.

context

Levin, PA, and Frederick, A. (1997). Awakening the Tiger: Healing Trauma: The Innate Ability to Transform Overwhelming Experiences. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

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