Ac Did Not Shut Off When Pan Over Flowed Heat Transfer Facts You Should Know To Save Energy

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Heat Transfer Facts You Should Know To Save Energy

We all know that water flows from mountains. If you want water to go up the hill, you have to “do some work” to get it there. If you don’t want water to flow down a hill, you have to “do something” to stop it, like building a dam. “Getting some work done” is like paying your energy bill because it causes some discomfort.

The first thing you need to know is that heat naturally flows from warmer areas to cooler areas.

Heat moves in three ways

One way of heat is radiation. We all know that if we are exposed to direct solar radiation, we can feel the heat of the sun flowing directly to us. The sun is very hot so heat flows from the sun to the earth. Sunburn is a result of solar radiation.

Another mode of heat movement is called conduction. Conduction describes the movement of heat through a solid. The handle of the iron pan heats up by moving it. We insulate the walls and attics of our homes to reduce heat conduction through the building structure.

Convection is the last form of heat transfer. Conventional means moving heat by moving heated air or water.

An example of convection that we use to heat our homes is a forced air furnace. A furnace heats air pushed into the house by a blower, to heat the house. This movement of warm air is an example of convection. Heat is carried from the furnace to the house.

Convection can also work against you. An example is warm air blowing over a chimney that carries heat through a house in the winter.

In summer, our living space has more heat than we want. We force heat to move the wrong way by taking heat out of our homes and putting it outside in hot places. It takes a large amount of energy to accomplish this because we are “doing some work” against the normal flow. It’s like pushing water up a mountain, it takes a lot of energy.

In the summer, our furnace fan moves warm air into a cooling coil inside the ductwork. This is convection, using air to transfer heat from heat to cool.

Energy saving action items

When it’s hot outside, heat moves into your home. We can reduce it by protecting and insulating our homes. Shielding and insulation is like building a dam to delay water runoff from a hill.

By shielding, I mean shade trees and light barriers like aluminum foil or special paint. A shield that either blocks the sun or reflects radiant energy away from where it was coming from can stop the sun’s rays from heating your homes. Solar window curtains act as partial sun blocks. Reflective radiant barrier materials act like mirrors and reflect or deflect radiant heat away from your home. This is how reflective film on windows works.

In winter when it is cold outside, we want solar radiation to fall on our homes. Planting trees that provide shade in the summer and sunlight in the winter is a natural way of seasonal protection.

Another way heat travels is conduction through the material. Insulation acts like a speed bump that slows the movement of heat through materials such as roofs, ceilings, floors and walls. The more insulation you have, the more heat is lost. The R number rating on an insulation material indicates how well it resists the conductive flow of heat. The higher the R number, the more it reduces heat flow. Read the title of my article for more details on this……..

We love convective heat transfer when hot air from the furnace moves through the house. We also love it when warm air flows from the house into the cool coils of the air conditioner. We don’t like convection when it helps heat escape through chimneys, around windows or under doors.

Saving energy means having high efficiency equipment to get the heat where it needs to go. It also means doing the best you can to stop or slow down the movement of heat where you don’t want it to go.

Improving your home’s weather sealing, radiation shielding and insulation are some of the best things you can do to lower your energy bill.

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