A Stream That Flows Into The River Is Called Granby CT: Best Communities For Your Home In Connecticut

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Granby CT: Best Communities For Your Home In Connecticut

Granby, Connecticut is a charming rural residential community located 14 miles north of Hartford on the north central border of Massachusetts. Granby is home to many urban professionals who work in Hartford’s insurance and financial industries.

Connecticut Magazine ranked Granby the #3 small town in all of Connecticut (population 10,000-1500) and the #1 small town in Hartford County. Granby’s combination of rural character and proximity to major metropolitan centers make Granby one of the best towns in Connecticut for your home and family.

The community we know today as Granby was a wilderness when it was settled in the 1680s by a handful of hardy Puritans who came up Talcott Ridge from Windsor and called the area “Salmon Brook.”

Because they were on the frontier of English civilization at the time, these so-called “outlanders” settled together for mutual support and protection on the branches of Salmon Brook—several miles from the main Simsbury settlement and “a large barren pine plain.” The soil was stony and the beautiful stone boundary fence that makes the town so charming today was able to clear fields of glacial rock and cultivate the land.

One of the early defining events of the community in 1707 was when twenty-two-year-old Daniel Hayes was captured by three Native Americans when he went to check on a horse in a pasture. The capture was witnessed by other settlers and a rescue party followed but was unable to overtake the captors.

He was tied up every night and taken on a month-long journey to Canada, then forced to run the gauntlet. Near the end of the gauntlet, he ran into the wigwam to avoid the club’s blow.

The woman of the wigwam, having recently lost her husband and son in battle, defied the attackers by declaring her refuge sacred and adopted Hayes as her son. He cared for the woman for several years and was eventually sold to a Frenchman.

The Frenchman made a deal with him, and Hayes earned enough to buy his freedom two years later. He then returned to the region from which he had been taken seven years earlier, settled on a farm in what is now Granby, and became prominent in the early affairs of the community.

By 1709, eleven families had settled in present-day Granby, but it was uninhabited during periods when the Indians threatened and slowed the growth of the community. As the aging population of the first generation of settlers grew older, they resented the long journey required to attend church in Simsbury each week, and finally in 1736 obtained the right to form their own church society.

They remained an independent spirited community and during the Revolutionary War resisted sending their townspeople to fight in the Continental Army and insisted on serving in their own militia companies. In 1786, Salmon Brook and Turkey Hills separated from Simsbury and became the town of Granby.

Today, the Salmon Brook Historical Society maintains the 1732 Abijah Row House, the 1790 Weed-Enders House, the 1870 Cooley School, and the 1914 Colton-Hayes Tobacco Barn and Museum, with many exhibits on 18th- and 19th-century life.

Housing in Granby is primarily older colonials and single-family homes of traditional design, although there are also condominiums and new construction. Along with many small businesses, there are also some family-owned farms and orchards that still operate along winding roads.

Granby’s education system, which provides public schools and a full academic program for about 2,200 students, also offers evening classes for adults.

The McLean Game Refuge is 3,400 acres and shaped by a glacier, providing outdoor activities such as nature study, hiking, cross-country skiing, and picnicking. Enders State Forest has a group of hiking trails up to six waterfalls. A 72-mile stream flows through the town, consisting of two branches of Salmon Brook and a major tributary of the Farmington River.

Recreational facilities include tennis courts, playgrounds, ball fields, a swimming pool, a summer day camp, and a youth center. The fun Memorial Day Road Race draws runners and spectators from Granby and neighboring towns.

About 25 minutes from both Hartford and Springfield, Massachusetts, Granby is served by state routes 10, 20, 189, 202 and 219. Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks is six miles east on Route 20.

Granby’s combination of rural charm and colonial homes, along with its proximity to major metropolitan centers, make Granby one of the best towns in Connecticut for your home and family.

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