A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure Financial Statements – Levels of Assurance

You are searching about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure, today we will share with you article about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure is useful to you.

Financial Statements – Levels of Assurance

Many small/medium sized businesses require or want formal financial statements prepared at the end of the year. This may be for a third party such as a bank or for internal use only. Not all financial statements are created equal.

As a business owner you have 3 options. Collection, review and audit. Each produces different reports, which accompany the financial statements even though the financials themselves should be very similar. Many business owners are unsure or unaware of their options, so I thought I would outline them for you.

Collection engagement

It is the most common, least expensive and generally required for all businesses. A compilation will provide the financial statements by attaching a ‘Notice to Reader’ (NTR) report. Under this engagement the financial statement preparer will only take the information provided by the client and consolidate them into standard financial statements. The financial statement shall reflect what the client has provided unless there is obvious or manifestly incorrect information. In fact, NTR does not give any assurance that the content of the statement produced by the report is accurate. Financial statements should still be presented in a consistent and readable manner.

Financial statements contain minimal notes and require less detail than other types of engagements. An income statement and balance sheet are usually included.

An example of a verification amount will be in the collection agreement. The owner of a retail outlet will state that they had $100,000 in inventory at the end of the year. A financial statement preparer under a pooling agreement will accept that value as fair and not misleading.

Review the engagement

A more detailed report will be prepared with the review and will accompany the financial statements. In this case the accountant needs to do more analysis, inquiry and disclosure. Financial statements must be prepared in accordance with GAAP (or IFRS) and include significant disclosures of any deviations.

Financial notes may include: details of capital assets, information on long-term debt, related party transactions, among others. Significant accounting policies will also be disclosed. Generally there will be an income statement, balance sheet and cash flow statement.

Using the inventory example again, the creator of a review engagement doesn’t just take its owner’s word for it. He can take a look at the inventory levels of previous years and compare. He may ask how the value of each unit was derived and perhaps even verify the market price per unit to ensure that it is reasonable.

Audit engagement

Audited financial statements require the most thorough work to assess the accuracy of the information provided. In addition to GAAP, accountants must follow GAAS (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards). It determines how the audit will be conducted. Finally the auditor is providing ‘reasonable assurance’ that there are no material misstatements on the financial statements. So they need to perform various tests to ensure that the information is captured correctly. The way ‘material misstatement’ is defined in this example means that only the user of the statement will be affected by any errors in the statements. As with review engagements, audited statements will contain a number of disclosures and notes that highlight anything users need to know when evaluating the statements.

In the case of our inventory value, there will in all likelihood be an auditor at the end of the year to verify that the calculations were done correctly.

Which level should I choose?

In many cases the loan agreement is the deciding factor in which route you go. If the bank says you need a reviewed statement to get a loan, you should review your statement. Another situation that might require more than a compilation would be when there are 2 or more unrelated owners and they want to make sure things are on and up. Perhaps the seller may require a review or audit to give the buyer more assurance. As I said earlier standard collection is the most common option and collection is usually the preferred option unless the 3rd party requests otherwise.

Video about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure

You can see more content about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure

If you have any questions about A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3459
Views: 50325223

Search keywords A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure

A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure
way A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure
tutorial A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure
A Statement Of Cash Flows And Its Related Disclosure free
#Financial #Statements #Levels #Assurance

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Financial-Statements—Levels-of-Assurance&id=6168349